February is Dental Health Month

posted: by: Staff Tags: "Clinic Specials" "News" 

 February is Dental Health Month!

Oral hygiene is an important part of your pet’s overall health care.  We recommend bringing your companion in yearly for a physical examination with your veterinarian. This exam includes assessing your pet’s oral health.

While brushing daily and providing dental treats are a great way to keep your pet’s gums and teeth healthy, a thorough dental cleaning by your veterinarian is sometimes necessary.

Dental cleaning is an anesthetic procedure. It is important to schedule an appointment with your veterinarian to discuss what to expect from anesthetic dentistry and review a procedure estimate. Because February is dental health month, we are offering a 10% discount off the total cost of your pet’s dental procedure!

Before

After


Why does dentistry require anesthesia?

When you go to the dentist, you know that what’s being done is meant to help you and keep your mouth healthy. Your dentist uses techniques to minimize pain and discomfort and can ask you how you are feeling, so you accept the procedures and do your best to keep still. Your pet does not understand the benefit of dental procedures, and he or she reacts by moving, trying to escape, or even biting.

Anesthesia makes it possible to perform the dental procedures with less stress and pain for your pet. In addition, anesthesia allows for a better cleaning because your pet is not moving around and risking injury from the dental equipment. If radiographs (x-rays) are needed, your pet needs to be very still in order to get good images, and this is unlikely without heavy sedation or anesthesia.

Although anesthesia will always have risks, it’s safer now than ever and continues to improve so that the risks are very low and are far outweighed by the benefits. Most pets can go home the same day of the procedure, although they might seem a little groggy for the rest of the day.

(https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/Pet-Dental-Care.aspx)

Signs your pet may need a dental evaluation

  • bad breath
  • broken or loose teeth
  • extra teeth or retained baby teeth
  • teeth that are discolored or covered in tartar
  • abnormal chewing, drooling, or dropping food from the mouth
  • reduced appetite or refusal to eat
  • pain in or around the mouth
  • bleeding from the mouth
  • swelling in the areas surrounding the mouth

Check out the video below for step by step introduction to brushing your pet’s teeth.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wB3GIAgrTPE


Do's and Don'ts of Brushing Your Pet's Teeth
DON'T USE A HUMAN TOOTHPASTE ON YOUR PET.
DO TRY TO PERFORM DENTAL HOME CARE AT LEAST ONCE DAILY.
DON'T CONSIDER DENTAL HOME CARE AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO FULL DENTAL CLEANING IF YOUR PET HAS MORE ADVANCED DENTAL DISEASE.

How much do you know about your pet’s oral health? Test your knowledge by following the link below!

http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/2511639/169767dabec4


What types of dental treats should I offer my dog or cat?

Finding an appropriate dental treat that is both safe for your pet and helpful in reducing calculus build up can be difficult when staring at the endless isles of a pet supply store. While many products are labeled as dental health treats or toys, our doctors recommend finding products that have the VOHC, Veterinary Oral Health Council, seal on the packaging.

What is the Veterinary Oral Health Council?

The Veterinary Oral Health Council evaluates dental products made for pets to be sure they actually do what they say they are going to do with regard to plaque and tartar control. If a product passes their evaluation protocol, it is awarded the VOHC Seal of Approval.

To find a complete list of VOHC approved items please visit their website. http://www.vohc.org/

We carry a small variety of C.E.T. dental chews in our office as well as a much larger variety of dental products on our online store at broadwayanimal.org 


What types of toys should I offer my pet?

Use your judgment with chew toys. A chew can be readily swallowed in a large chunk and lead to intestinal obstruction. A pet with diseased teeth may break teeth on a hard chew.

COW HOOVES AND BONES ARE NOT APPROPRIATE CHEW TOYS AS THEY ARE TOO HARD AND READILY BREAK TEETH.

Pig ears are well loved by most dogs and have been known to have bacterial contamination. Dogs with sensitive stomachs often do not tolerate the smokey flavor. No studies have been performed regarding prevention of dental disease using pig ear chews.

 

 

 

Want to read more about at home dental care and anesthetic dentistry? Follow the links below.

Dental Home Care

http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&S=0&C=0&A=640

What to expect if your pet needs Dental Care

http://www.veterinarypartner.com/Content.plx?P=A&S=0&C=0&A=168